5 Ways to Stay Hydrated For a Run

The official start of summer is almost here, but I’m sure you’ve already experienced some rather warm days or downright scorchers…I know I have! Here in Portland, we had two 100 degree days last weekend sandwiched between a couple 90-92 degree days. “Unseasonably hot” is an understatement to explain those early June temperatures But as they always say, the run must go on!

I have a marathon coming up in July–still trying to decide between two: Foot Traffic Flat or The Oregon Marathon–and there’s no time to waste! My training period is shorter than I’d like to be by at least 4 weeks so I have had to take advantage of every opportunity to run that there has been.

When it was 100 degrees, as previously mentioned, this mentality didn’t shift. Of course, the planned mileage was altered and I didn’t run for 13 or so miles in 2 hours in 95 degrees, but I did run for 10 miles which took almost two hours due to stopping several times to cool down. I had two bottles with me–one was for drinking and so it had an electrolyte tablet in it, and the other was to use on me to cool me down when by body was heating up…man did that help! I remember when my mom was out for a run one time a few years ago and it was 90 degrees and humid back in New Jersey at the time. You were dripping sweat just from walking to your car. Well, she got lightheaded and dizzy after about 2 or 3 miles and called me to pick her up and I’ll never forget the sound of her voice. She knew she was hot and thirsty which she has experienced, but she was actually afraid something was wrong with her because she had never felt like this way before. Luckily I picked her up and she had been standing in the shade to cool off and she was completely fine, but my heart was racing the whole drive to get her.

Please, please, please…Do not underestimate the sun and the heat. It can be very dangerous to do so and the danger can really sneak up on you. I’m not saying don’t run or be outside; just be well-prepared. And hydration is an important part of that preparation.

Here are my 5 ways to stay hydrated before and during a run:

no1        Small Bottle

4  I use amphipod bottles because I like the way they feel in my hand. They are ergonomically designed which makes them, for me, easier to hold which is important because you don’t want to run with any sort of added stress or discomfort other than what may be in your head. This small bottle pictured above is 10 oz and I use it on warm to mildly hot days of mileage anywhere from 8 miles to 14 miles. I have two of them so if I need one to be a water squirting bottle, the other can be my hydration bottle. It’s perfect. Nuun is my electrolye of choice but 16 oz is ideal for a whole tablet and so I only use half a tablet when I use these smaller bottles. It’s a tad lighter since 10 oz is more than 8 oz, but it’s still drinkable and I’m not doing it for flavor anyway!

no2  Large Bottle

5 This larger 20 oz Amphipod bottle is probably one of my best running investments. I’ll use the larger bottle for anything over 15 miles or 2 hours of running in temps ranging from warm to hot. It took some time to get used to running with over a pound in your hand, but I got used to it quickly. The design of the amphipod bottle really helps here. I have two of these bottles and I’ve used both on a run with the same purpose as stated above. I am contemplating using two bottles for the July marathon as one 20 oz bottle proved to not be enough during my last marathon. You may not like the idea of holding a bottle while you run–although I promise you that you will likely get used to it–and so there is another option you may prefer.

no3Bladder pack or pack with pockets

7

A bladder pack allows you to run with a lightweight, running-specific pack with a water bladder inside and a straw that connects to it. This can be a heavier option depending on the pack you choose and how much water you put in it, but it can be a life-saver for those who run long, in very hot temperatures, and/or those who sweat a lot. When I was training for my first ultramarathon, I was running with a walking-pack with a bladder (not meant for running and so it was on the heavier side) but I realized that I prefer a lighter pack that can maybe hold a bottle in the pack and free up my hands for an additional bottle or two. The Nathan pack pictured above is super lightweight and doesn’t offer much for carrying purposes, but it has two pockets which are great for my cell and for my 10 oz bottle. That way, I can run without anything in my hands, or I can hold another bottle. Also, there is enough room for keys and/or gels or dates if you desire the calories on the run.

no4  Bottle Stash!

6

Another option is to hide your bottles of water or hydration beverage along your running route. This option requires a bit more time to place your bottles (depending on your route), but can be pretty convenient if you really don’t like running while holding anything whether it be on your back or in your hands. You can stash a bottle in a bush somewhere or behind a tree that stands out. If you are running on a looped route near your home, an option is to leave a bottle on your porch or maybe your mailbox. I haven’t done this before as I don’t mind holding anything, but it’s definitely a good option for staying hydrated during the run.

no5Hydrate Before

1  6

And I’ve saved the most important for last! You can plan to down two 20 oz bottles during your weekend long run, but if you haven’t hydrated or are actually dehydrated from the beginning, those 40 oz will likely not prevent you from feeling the effects of poor hydration. Muscle cramps. Tiring. Slow paces. Increased effort to run. Fuzziness or dizziness. It’s all possible when you’re dehydrated from the start. Throughout the week you should obviously be drinking plenty of water, but it’s important to be getting all of your electrolytes through proper nutrition as well. Fruits and plenty of vegetables are great for this, but make sure your sodium intake is good as well especially if you will be running in the heat often and even more especially if you are a heavy sweater. To help with my hydration and electrolyte intake, I try to always have coconut water (my favorite is C2O) waiting for me in the fridge to help out with my potassium and sodium (not high in sodium though) levels.

There you have it! Five options for staying hydrated before and during your summer running (and even your fall, winter, and spring running).

Run smart. Run Happy.

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